The Leading Hue of Spring 2013: Hot Pink

Hot pink is poised to add zest and zeal to the fashion-industry palette this year. Forecast as the leading hue of spring and summer 2013 and found in current fashions by Phillip Lim, Oscar de la Renta and John Rocha, president of sales for Dyenomite . “It’s a color that stimulates energy (the same high energy as red) and gives off a positive vibe, which is what the end-user is looking for in these difficult times.” He makes particular note of retail fashions and their integration of bright colors: “Hot pink and other neon colors are everywhere, including tennis shoes and shoe- laces, shorts, women’s tops and leggings, men’s dress shirts and polo shirts and even backpacks, to name just a few items.Fa

Ron Wood, CEO of Tunewear LLC, endorses hot pink for its notably upbeat and youthful attributes. “Besides being a bright color that stands out, it’s also adventurous and positive,” he says. “It represents good health, good fortune and good times and symbolizes the notions of love, joy and happiness.” The popularity of this playful, attention- grabbing hue and its application to retail apparel and accessories of all sorts is indicative of the resurgent economy and greater confidence in renewed financial security. Along with other popular brights, such as Pantone’s Lemon Zest and Poppy Red, hot pink aims to keep spirits high and maintain a general sense of optimism.

Hot pink has gained momentum over the last couple of years,” says Paul Kory, vice president of sales for Dyenomite. “It’s a color that stimulates energy (the same high energy as red) and gives off a positive vibe, which is what the end-user is looking for in these difficult times.” He makes particular note of retail fashions and their integration of bright colors: “Hot pink and other neon colors are everywhere, including tennis shoes and shoe- laces, shorts, women’s tops and leggings, men’s dress shirts and polo shirts and even backpacks, to name just a few items.”

Kory says that hot pink can be applied across industries; he also believes it will become more ubiquitous over time, specifically within the education industry, corporate markets and charity organizations.